Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education Editorial Committee

 

Janet R. Barrett

Janet R. Barrett
Marilyn Pflederer Zimmerman Scholar in Music Education
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Professor, Music Education
Editor, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education

Janet Revell Barrett is the Marilyn Pflederer Zimmerman Endowed Scholar in Music Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research interests include the reconceptualization of the music curriculum, secondary general music, interdisciplinary approaches in music, and music teacher education. Barrett has published widely in music education and is an author or editor of five books: Sound Ways of Knowing: Music in the Interdisciplinary Curriculum; Looking In On Music Teaching; Constructing a Personal Orientation to Music Teaching; Music Education at a Crossroads; and The Musical Experience: Rethinking Music Teaching and Learning. She has also served on the faculty of Northwestern University and the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. Prior to her work in higher education, Barrett taught general and choral music in Iowa and Wisconsin. She is immediate past chair of the Society for Music Teacher Education and editor of the Bulletin for the Council of Research in Music Education.

 

Joseph Abramo

Joseph Abramo
University of Connecticut

Joseph Abramo, Ed. D. is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Music Education in the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut, where he teaches undergraduate courses in instrumental methods and graduate courses in the theoretical foundations of music education and popular music and informal learning, and supervises student teachers. His areas of research include popular music, music teacher education, gender, cultural studies, race and multiculturalism, disability studies, poststructuralism, and constructivism. His articles include publications in Music Educators Journal, The Journal of Research in Music Education, The Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Music Education Research, The Philosophy of Music Education Review, Research Studies in Music Education, The Journal of Music Teacher Education, Music Education Research International, and Visions of Research in Music Education. He has also presented at various international, national, and regional conferences. Dr. Abramo serves on the advisory committee of Music Educators Journal and is the Chair of the Philosophy Special Research Interest Group of the National Association for Music Education. He served as an early reviewer for the new national standards in music. He also served as a co-chair of Gender Research in Music Education (GRIME) and a co-editor of its on-line, peer-reviewed journal Gender, Education, Music, Society. Dr. Abramo received The Outstanding Emerging Researcher Award from the Center for Music Education Research at the University of South Florida. He holds degrees from Teachers College of Columbia University, Michigan State University, and the Crane School of Music at SUNY Potsdam. He previously served as an Assistant Professor of Music Education at Hartwick College in Oneonta, New York.

 

Randall Everett Allsup

Randall Everett Allsup
Assistant Professor of Music Education
Teachers College Columbia University, New York, New York
http://www.reallsup.com/

Randall Everett Allsup holds degrees in music performance and music education from Northwestern and Columbia University. Randall graduated from Teachers College in 2002 and received the Outstanding Dissertation of the Year Award by the Council for Research in Music Education for Crossing Over: Mutual Learning and Democratic Action in Instrumental Music Education. Before returning to Teachers College as assistant professor, Randall was coordinator of music education and director of bands at Hartwick College, Oneonta, NY. He has taught courses in music education and conducting at the Chinese Culture University, Taiwan, and in 2009, he was awarded a Fulbright grant to teach and conduct research at the Sibelius Academy, Helsinki, Finland. Randall currently teaches courses in creativity and problem solving; democracy and music education; philosophies of music education; and doctoral seminar. He is the proud recipient of the Outstanding Teaching Award at Columbia.

Randall's interests in issues surrounding social justice and democracy were sharpened by coursework with Maxine Greene and his work in schools in neglected neighborhoods of New York City, teaching music at Cardinal Hayes High School in the South Bronx and through the Our Children's Foundation in west Harlem. In 2006, Randall hosted and organized the first-ever "International Conference on Music Education, Equity, and Social Justice" at Teachers College. Today, he remains a passionate advocate of the transformative affects of public schooling and arts education.

Randall writes about the challenges of reconceptualizing music pedagogy, with a special interest instrumental and popular music.His teaching and scholarship is shaped by great thinkers like Maxine Greene, Paulo Freire, and John Dewey. His articles appear in Philosophy of Music Education Review; Theory into Practice; Music Education Research; Music Educators Journal; Bluegrass Music News; School Music News; Visions of Research in Music Education; Teaching Music; Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education; Nordic Research in Music Education; Finnish Journal of Music Education; British Journal of Music Education;and Journal of Research in Music Education. He serves on the editorial boards of Music Education Research, Finnish Journal of Music Education, and the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education.

 

Dr. William I. Bauer

William I. Bauer
University of Florida

Dr. William I. Bauer is an Associate Professor of Music Education and Director of the Online Master of Music in Music Education program in the School of Music of the University of Florida. At UF Dr. Bauer teaches undergraduate and graduate level classes in music education that include music education research, measurement and assessment, technology for music learning, and music in higher education. From 2001-2013 he was the Director of Music Education and Associate Professor of Music at Case Western Reserve University, where he also served as the University Director of Teacher Licensure from 2004-2007. Dr. Bauer has also served as a music education faculty member at Ball State University and Radford University. A native of Northeastern Ohio, Bauer taught instrumental (band and orchestra) and general music for eight years in the Ohio public schools.

Dr. Bauer has published his research and other writings in the Journal of Research in Music Education, the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, UPDATE: The Applications of Research in Music Education, the Journal of Music Teacher Education, Contributions to Music Education, the Music Educators Journal, the Journal of Band Research, the Journal of Technology in Music Learning, the Southeastern Journal of Music Education, TRIAD, the Indiana Musicator, additional journals outside of music and music education, and several book chapters. He is currently a member of the editorial boards of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Journal of Music Teacher Education, and Research and Issues in Music Education. His book, Music Learning Today: Digital Pedagogy for Creating, Performing and Responding to Music was published in early 2014. He is the former editor of Contributions to Music Education, and a former member of the editorial committees of the Music Educators Journal, the Journal of the Research Center for Educational Technology, and the American Educational Research Association book series Advances in Music Education Research.

Professor Bauer has presented at numerous conferences and other events throughout the U.S. and internationally. He is founder and facilitator of the International Society for Technology in Education's (ISTE) Special Interest Group for Music and Technology and a past Chair of the National Association for Music Education's (NAfME) Assessment Special Research Interest Group (SRIG).  He is an active member of many professional organizations. Dr. Bauer was named an Apple Distinguished Educator by Apple, Inc. in 2003, an M-Powered Educator by M-Audio in 2005, a Google Certified Teacher by Google in 2008, and a MusicFirst Ambassador in 2013. A graduate of The Ohio State University (BME), Bowling Green State University (MM), and Kent State University (PhD), his major areas of interest and research include the applications of technology to music teaching and learning, music teacher education, instrumental music education, and music cognition. For further information, please visit http://billbauer.net.

 

Margaret Haefner Berg

Margaret Haefner Berg
Associate Professor of Instrumental/String Music Education, Chair of Music Education
University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado

Berg received her BS in music education from Case Western Reserve University, BM in violin from the Cleveland Institute of Music, MEd from the University of Cincinnati, and PhD from Northwestern University. Previously she was on the faculty at Ball State University where she also conducted the East Central String Sinfonietta and was a member of the Muncie Symphony Orchestra. She has also taught at DePaul University and in the Cincinnati Public Schools. Dr. Berg is an active orchestra festival conductor and state and national conference clinician as well as former President of Colorado ASTA w/NSOA (American String Teachers Association with National School Orchestra Association). Her research interests include the social psychology of music education, string/orchestra pedagogy and curriculum development, and teacher education. Dr. Berg has published articles in the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Music Education Research, Psychology of Music, Journal of Music Teacher Education, Music Educators Journal, and American String Teacher as well as contributed to various books, including Teaching Music Through Performance in Orchestra (volume 1, 2 and 3), Applying Research to Teaching and Playing Stringed Instruments, Advances in Music Education Research and the recently published Musical Experiences in Our Lives. She currently serves on the editorial boards of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education and Journal of String Research.

 

Louis Bergonzi

Louis Bergonzi
Professor of Conducting and Music Education/Strings, Chair of the Music Education Division, and Conductor of the UI Philharmonia Orchestra
University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois

Dr. Louis Bergonzi was appointed to the University of Illinois faculty in 2005. Previously he was on the faculty of the Eastman School of Music for 16 years. A frequent presenter at regional, state, national, and international teachers' conferences, Bergonzi's areas of expertise include orchestra rehearsal technique, conducting, and string teaching, particularly in an urban setting. His extensive experience in these areas include acting as director of the Eastman Summer Music Academy for String Teachers (1995-1999); director of the Rochester-Eastman Urban String Project (1997-2005); conductor of numerous all-state honor orchestras; Melbourne Australia Summer Youth Music (1999-2005); Hong Kong Summer Youth Orchestras (1997); and All-State Intermediate Orchestra at Interlochen (1985-1990).

Bergonzi's research involves secondary data analysis of large-scale, nationally representative data sets to consider issues in the sociology of music education and arts education policy. His efforts have garnered several research grants and fellowships, including Yamaha Music Education Research Project (1995- ); National Endowment for the Arts (1993-95, 1997- ); and Bridging Fellowship in Public Policy Analysis, University of Rochester (1995). In 2010, he was co-director of Establishing Identity: LGBT Studies and Music Education, a symposium that provided energy to the discussion of how LGBT issues operate within music education in terms of research, curriculum, teacher preparation, and the musical lives and careers of LGBT music students and teachers.

He has written for the American String Teacher, the Music Educators Journal, and the Journal of Research in Music Education. Dr. Bergonzi contributed a chapter on teacher preparation for work in diverse classrooms in the ASTA publication, String Teaching in America: Strategies for a Diverse Society. He was also co-editor for MENC of a compilation of teaching strategies organized around the national music standards, and co-author of Effects of Arts Education on Participation in the Arts and Americans' Musical Preferences (National Endowment for the Arts, 1996/2002) and of Teaching Music Through Performance in Orchestra, Volumes 1, 2, and 3 (GIA, 2002/2003/2007).

 

Mark R. Campbell

Mark R. Campbell
Associate Professor of Music Education
Crane School of Music, SUNY, Potsdam, New York

Mark Robin Campbell, Associate Professor of Music Education at the Crane School of Music, State University of New York at Potsdam, teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in music education. His public school teaching includes over 25 years of experience in general music, band, chorus and orchestra in Illinois and New York. Campbell is author/editor of numerous articles and books including: Constructing a Personal Orientation to Music Teaching (Routlege) and On Musicality and Milestone: Selected Writings of Marilyn Pflederer Zimmerman with Contributions from the Profession (University of Illinois). His articles can be found in the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Journal of Research in Music Education, Music Educators Journal, Journal of Aesthetic Education, and others. He is currently a Co-Editor of Advances in Music Education Research (Information Age Publishing), a book series project of the Music Education Special Interest Group of AERA. Campbell holds Master's and doctoral degrees in music education from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

 

Alice-Ann Darrow

Alice-Ann Darrow
Irvin Cooper Professor of Music Therapy and Music Education
Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida

Dr. Darrow came to The Florida State University in 2003 from The University of Kansas.

She received her BM, BME, MM, and PhD degrees at The Florida State University, and taught in music programs for students with and without disabilities in Miami, Florida before going to the University of Kansas.

Her teaching and research interests are teaching music to special populations and the role of music in deaf culture. Related to these topics, she has been the recipient of over twenty federal, university, or corporate grants, and published numerous monographs, research articles, and book chapters. She is editor of the text Introduction to Approaches in Music Therapy, and co-author of Music in Special Education and Music and Geriatric Populations. Darrow serves on the editorial boards of the Bulletin for the Council on Research in Music Education, Music Therapy Perspectives, and Update: Applications of Research in Music Education, General Music Today and Florida Music Director. She is commission chair for the International Society for Music Education. She has been the recipient of: the Ella Scoble Opperman Faculty Citation award from the FSU College of Music, research and clinical practice awards from the American Music Therapy Association; and while at The University of Kansas, the University's Silver Anniversary Teaching Award, an Intrauniversity Professorship in special education and hearing science, and membership in the KU Women's Hall of Fame.

 

Kenneth Elpus

Kenneth Elpus
Assistant Professor of Music Education
University of Maryland, College Park

Kenneth Elpus is Assistant Professor of Music Education at the University of Maryland, College Park, where he teaches undergraduate classes in choral music education, graduate courses in music education research, and conducts the University Women's Chorus. He holds the Bachelor of Music degree in choral music education from The College of New Jersey and earned the master of music and doctor of philosophy degrees in music education at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL. Ken's research examines issues of demographics and selection into music study, music education in education policy, and music education as a context for positive youth development. This work is published in the Journal of Research in Music Education, Arts Education Policy Review, and the Music Educators Journal, among other venues. His research agenda at the University of Maryland is funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Maud Hickey

Maud Hickey
Northwestern University

Maud Hickey is Associate Professor and coordinator of Music Education in the Bienen School of Music at Northwestern University. Hickey's research interest lies in the teaching of, as well as assessment of, musical creativity as manifest through improvisation and composition. She is a five-year recipient of a $50,000 grant from the Chicago Community Trust to work with juveniles in the Cook County Juvenile Detention Center on music composition projects. Her book Music Outside the Lines: Ideas for Composing Music in K-12 Classrooms was recently published by Oxford University Press (2012). She is the author of chapters in several books and articles in journals such as in Music Educators Journal, General Music Today, Journal of Research in Music Education, and Research Studies in Music Education. Hickey has been invited to present her work at several state, regional, national and international conferences. She currently serves as a member of the Society for Research in Music Education Executive Committee, and on the professional development committee of the College Music Society. In 2012, she was appointed a member of the inaugural cohort of Faculty Fellows for Northwestern's Center for Civic Engagement. Previous to work at the University level, Dr. Hickey was a public school band director.

 

Julia Eklund Koza

Julia Eklund Koza
Professor of Music Education, Music Education Area Chair
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

Julia Eklund Koza (B. A. magna cum laude, St. Olaf College, 1974; M. A. University of Iowa, 1978; Ph.D. University of Minnesota, 1988) is a professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and the School of Music. In addition she is a Faculty Affiliate in the Women's Studies Program and has served as Chair of Music Education since 1998. Her widely published research focuses on equity and social justice issues in education, music, and music education, as well as on corporate influence on music education policy. Her work has appeared in the Musical Quarterly, Journal of Research in Music Education, Philosophy of Music Education Review, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Review of Education/Pedagogy/Cultural Studies, Educational Foundations, the Quarterly, and Music Educators Journal. Author of chapters in a number of edited collections and of the book Stepping Across: Four Interdisciplinary Studies of Education and Cultural Politics (2003), she is currently working on a second book, Kissing the Scars: Re-Imagining Professionalism in Academe. She has served on the editorial board of several scholarly journals, including the Journal of Research in Music Education, the Quarterly, and GEMS. Professor Koza began her teaching career in River Falls, Wisconsin, where she taught choral and general music in the public schools.

 

Pat Krueger

Pat Krueger
Professor, Music Education
University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA

Professor Pat Krueger chairs the music education program at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, WA, and teaches courses in music education. She maintains an active commitment to urban and multicultural arts education, and her research focuses on socialization of beginning music teachers in public schooling.

Dr. Krueger previously taught K-12 music in Wisconsin public schools. She earned her BME from the University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire, and her MM and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Her publications include chapters in The Oxford Handbook of Qualitative Research in Music Education (Oxford, 2014), Great Beginnings for Music Teachers: Mentoring and Supporting New Teachers, and articles in Journal of Research in Music Education, Music Educator's Journal, Update, Journal of Music Teacher Education, and Arts Education Policy Review. She has presented at National and Northwest Music Educators' Conferences and at other professional organizations.

 

Roger Mantie

Roger Mantie
Arizona State University

Roger's Mantie's (PhD, University of Toronto; MM, Brandon University) teaching and scholarship are informed by his fourteen years as a school music educator. Prior to his appointment at Arizona State University, Roger was an assistant professor at Boston University's College of Fine Arts. His work emphasizes connections between schooling and society, with an focus on lifelong engagement in and with music. Former Chair of the Philosophy Special Research Interest Group of NAfME and current Secretary of the International Society for the Philosophy of Music Education and Website Manager for the MayDay Group, Roger is on the editorial boards of Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education, the International Journal of Community Music, and the Canadian Music Educator, and is a co-editor for the [Oxford] Handbook of Technology and Music Education (forthcoming) and the [Oxford] Handbook of Music Making and Leisure (forthcoming).

 

Pete Miksza

Pete Miksza
Associate Professor of Music Education
Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, Bloomington, Indiana

His teaching duties include undergraduate and graduate courses with emphases on instrumental music teacher preparation, psychological dimensions of music teaching and learning, and research methods. He also works with graduate students to develop and carry out original research projects as theses and dissertations.

Prior to his appointment at IU, Miksza served as band director at Pequannock Valley Middle School, assistant marching band director at Pequannock Township High School in New Jersey, and assistant professor of music education at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

His primary research interests lie in the investigation of music practicing and music teacher preparation. He has presented papers at regional, national, and international research conferences and has articles and book chapters published in several prominent peer-reviewed publications, such as the Journal of Research in Music Education, the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Psychology of Music, Contributions to Music Education, Music Education Research International, and the Journal of Music Teacher Education.

Miksza serves on the Advisory Committee of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, is an active participant in the Society for Music Teacher Education, and serves as a reviewer for the American Educational Research Association Music Education Special Interest Group. He is also a recipient of the Outstanding Emerging Researcher Award issued by the Center for Music Education Research at the University of South Florida.

Miksza founded and directed the University of Colorado Middle School Wind and String Ensemble, a middle school band and string outreach program, and co-founded the university's innovative music teacher recruitment program, Trying on Teaching. In addition, he served as faculty advisor for the Collegiate National Association for Music Education Chapter at the school.

 

David E. Myers

David E. Myers
Director of the School of Music
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

David Myers, Professor and Director of the School of Music, is an internationally regarded music educator and proponent of innovation in higher music education. Prior to coming to the University of Minnesota in 2008, he founded the Center for Educational Partnerships and its groundbreaking Sound Learning partnership among Georgia State University, the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, community musicians, and inner-city schools. A former public school teacher and accomplished organist, he has been the American consultant for a joint Master of Music degree for New Audiences and Innovative Practice among five European conservatories. He has served as panel chair and panelist for the National Endowment for the Arts and keynoted numerous meetings, including the League of American Orchestras national convention, the International Research in Music Education Conference at the University of Exeter (UK), and the national meeting of the College Music Society. He has published, presented, and consulted widely, including work with the National Association of Schools of Music, the National Guild of Community Schools of the Arts, Opera America, the Music Educators National Conference, the College Music Society, and the International Society for Music Education. He has served as author and editor for sections on lifelong learning and school-community partnerships in two major music education handbooks. He currently serves on the editorial committees of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education and the International Journal of Community Music. His 1996 research for NEA, Beyond Tradition: Partnerships Among Orchestras, Schools, and Communities, remains a seminal publication in the field. Dr. Myers's work has been recognized by the Atlanta Partners in Education and in Harvard Project Zero's study, Qualities of Quality. He received both the junior and senior outstanding faculty awards from the College of Arts and Sciences at Georgia State University, as well as the 2008 Distinguished Career Award from the Georgia Music Educators Association. In 2010, his biography was included in the New Groves Dictionary of American Music, 2nd edition. As an evaluator, he has conducted research for the League of American Orchestras on the Orchestra Leadership Academy, the Institutional Vision Program, the Ford Made in America program, and the American Conducting Fellows Program. In addition to NEA, his work has been funded by the Texaco Foundation, the Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education, and the Cousins Foundation. Currently, he serves as a Governing Board member of the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra. Dr. Myers has been a professor of curriculum and instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and in 1993 was a visiting professor in the Sydney (AUS) Conservatorium of Music, University of Sydney. He holds degrees from Lebanon Valley College, the Eastman School of Music, and The University of Michigan.

 

Alison M. Reynolds

Alison M. Reynolds
Associate Professor of Music Education
Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Dr. Reynolds teaches undergraduates courses and guides field experiences in general music; collaborates with undergraduate Diamond Research Scholars, Diamond Peer Teachers, and recipients of Creative Arts grants; teaches graduate courses in music research, learning theory, and practice; and guides pre-dissertation and dissertation research.

Dr. Reynolds is co-author of Jump Right In: The Music Curriculum (Revised Edition), and Music Play: Guide for Parents, Teachers, and Caregivers (translations into the Korean, Lithuanian, and Chinese), both published by GIA in Chicago. She is on the editorial review boards for the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education and He Kupu (the word). Her research is published in the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Journal of Research in Music Education, Research in Music Education, Journal of Historical Research in Music Education, and Journal of Music Teacher Education. She is author or co-author for articles in Perspectives; several state music educator journals; and book chapters on topics such as parents' documentation of their children's music behaviors, parallels between language development and music development, early childhood curriculum, movement, professional development for music teachers, and mentoring undergraduate teaching assistants who are "trying on" teaching in higher education. She has presented research and practice sessions at venues such as International Society for Music Education and the Early Childhood Music Education Commission, National Association for Music Education (NAfME), International Conference on Narrative Inquiry in Music Education, New Directions Conference, International Service-Learning Research Conference, International Conference on Civic Education Research, and NAfME All-Eastern Division Conference, and state music educators conferences.

Dr. Reynolds is Chair of the Early Childhood Music Special Research Interest Group (NAfME) and Chair of Research for Pennsylvania Music Educators Association.

 

Kathryn Roulston

Kathryn Roulston
Professor
Qualitative Research Program
Department of Lifelong Education, Administration, and Policy
University of Georgia

Kathryn Roulston is Professor in the Qualitative Research Program in the Department of Lifelong Education, Administration, and Policy in the College of Education at the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia, where she teaches qualitative research methods. She has a Bachelor of Music Education from the Queensland Conservatorium of Music, a Masters of Music (School Music with Kodály emphasis) from the University of Calgary, Canada, and a PhD in Education from the University of Queensland. Prior to moving to the United States, she taught classroom music in elementary schools (P-8) in Queensland, Australia, and was adjunct instructor in pre-service teacher education programs at the University of Southern Queensland and Queensland University of Technology. In addition to continuing to research topics in music education in collaboration with colleagues in the Hugh Hodgson School of Music at UGA, her research interests include qualitative research methods, qualitative interviewing, and analyses of talk-in-interaction. She is author of Reflective interviewing: A guide to theory and practice (Sage, 2010), and has contributed chapters to The SAGE handbook of interview research: The complexity of the craft (2012, 2nd ed.), as well as forthcoming volumes, The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Data Analysis and the Oxford Handbook of Qualitative Research in American Music Education. She has also published articles in a variety of journals, including Music Education Research, the International Journal of Music Education, Research Studies in Music Education, International Journal of Education and the Arts, Qualitative Research, Qualitative Inquiry, International Journal of Research and Method in Education, International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Reflective Practice, Oxford Review of Education, Educational Action Research and Applied Linguistics.

 

Patrick Schmidt

Patrick Schmidt
University of Western Ontario

Patrick Schmidt will become chair of music education at University of Western Ontario, starting July 2015. Currently, he is Associate Professor of Music Education and Associate Director of Florida International University's School of Music in Miami, Florida. His innovative work in critical pedagogy, urban music education and policy studies is recognized nationally and internationally. His most recent publications can be found in the International Journal of Music Education; Arts Education Policy Review; Journal of Curriculum Theorizing; Philosophy of Music Education Review; Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education; ABEM Journal in Brazil; and the Finnish Journal of Music Education. He has co-edited the 2012 NSSE book with Teachers College Press and a special issue of the education journal Theory into Practice. Patrick co-edited the upcoming Oxford Handbook of Music Education and Social Justice, alongside Cathy Benedict, Gary Spruce, and Paul Woodford, also at Western. Schmidt is currently working on a single-authored book on Policy and Music Education for Oxford University Press and another co-edited book on international policy perspective with Richard Colwell.

 

Bret P. Smith

Bret P. Smith
Associate Professor of Music Education
Assessment Coordinator
Central Washington University

Associate Professor of Music Education (B.A., B.M. with honors, University of Washington; M.M., Ph.D., University of Michigan)

Bret Smith is a teacher educator, conductor, and cellist who specializes in instrumental music education. He holds degrees in music and systematic musicology from the University of Washington, where he worked with James C. Carlsen and Barbara Reeder Lundquist, and a Master of Music and Doctor of Philosophy in music education from the University of Michigan, where his mentors were Robert L. Culver, James O. Froseth, Richard J. Colwell, and Anthony Elliott. He teaches courses in string pedagogy and methods, curriculum and assessment, music theory, and the psychology of music, as well as serving as faculty advisor and Master Teacher for the CWU Preparatory Strings program, which received a National String Project Consortium grant through the NAMM Foundation in 2008.

Smith is co-author, with James O. Froseth, of the innovative string method Do It! Play Strings published by GIA Publications. In addition to incorporating sequential pedagogy into authentic, diverse musical repertoire, he performed all the cello models and produced and mixed the 8 CDs that define the curriculum. His research interests include student motivation and personal investment in instrumental music study, personality and music teaching and learning, and the assessment of musical learning. He has published articles in Psychology of Music, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, the Journal of Research in Music Education, and the American String Teacher and contributed chapters to all three volumes of the popular book series Teaching Music Through Performance in Orchestra. His presentations include the Midwest International Band and Orchestra Clinic, the Eastern and Northwest Division conferences of the National Association for Music Education, the American String Teachers Association national conference, the West Virginia, Colorado, and Washington Music Educators Association state conferences, the Asia- Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research, Integrating Curriculum, Theory, and Practice: A Symposium on Assessment in Music Education held in Gainesville, FL, the Violin Society of America national conference, and the National Association of Schools of Music national conference. He frequently provides in-service sessions in the public schools, adjudicates orchestra festivals, and serves as a consultant for private and public arts organizations. He is currently a Research Advisor for the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards and past chair of NAfME's Special Research Interest Group on Assessment.

Since 2010, Bret Smith has been part of the production team for Synergia Northwest and served as arranger, performer, and orchestra conductor for these unique benefit concerts. The 2012 Music Matters Live! event focused on Washington State's specialty license plate approved by the Legislature that year. These concerts bring together student and professional players as well as some of the region's stellar contemporary artists. Past collaborators include Alan White (Yes, John Lennon), Tracy Bonham, John Popper, Queensryche, Vicci Martinez, LeRoy Bell and His Only Friends, Geoffrey Castle, BRAD, Howard Leese, Roger Fisher, Steve Fossen, Michael DeRosier, Somar Macek, Caspian Coberly, and many more.

 

Brent C. Talbot

Brent C. Talbot
Gettysburg College

Brent C. Talbot is Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Music Education at the Sunderman Conservatory of Music at Gettysburg College, where he supervises student teaching and teaches music education courses on sociology, language and culture, general and choral methods and conducting. He is artistic director of the Gettysburg Children's Choir and founding director of Gamelan Gita Semara. Talbot received degrees in music education and ethnomusicology from the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester (Ph.D. & M.A.) and the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University (B.M.E.). Prior to his appointments in Gettysburg, Talbot served on the faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. As a scholar, he has published numerous chapters in edited collections and articles in the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education, Visions of Research in Music Education, PMEA News, and the Illinois Music Educator. Talbot's areas of expertise include: discourse analysis, culturally relevant music pedagogies, and music technology and media. Prior to his work in higher education, he taught choral and general music in Rochester and Brooklyn, NY. Talbot serves as chair-elect of NAfME's Social Science SRIG and is on the steering committee for the MayDay Group. He serves on the editorial boards of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education and the Journal of Homosexuality and is associate editor for the journal Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education. For more information about Brent's credentials, publications, and interests, visit his website at www.brentctalbot.com.

 

David Teachout

David Teachout
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

David J. Teachout is Professor and Head of the Music Education Department at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) and serves as Institutional Representative for UNCG to the National Association of Schools of Music. His degrees are from West Virginia University (BME), the University of Oklahoma (MME), and Kent State University (PhD). Prior to joining the faculty at UNCG in 2004, he taught undergraduate and graduate courses at the University of Minnesota and at Pennsylvania State University; he also enjoyed ten years of successful public school instrumental music teaching experience in Moore, Oklahoma.

Dr. Teachout's research interest is in music teacher development. His work has been presented at state, regional, national, and international conferences and published in Journal of Research in Music Education, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Psychology of Music, Arts Education Policy Review, Journal of Music Teacher Education, Journal of Band Research, Contributions in Music Education, Southeastern Journal of Music Education, and in numerous symposium proceedings. Additionally, he is co-author of The Journey from Music Student to Teacher: A Professional Approach, published by Routledge. Dr. Teachout was Co-Principle Investigator for a $374,000 National Science Foundation grant funded to develop interdisciplinary teaching modules for grades 2–5 that explore natural intersections between science and music. Further, Dr. Teachout serves on the editorial review board for Research Issues in Music Education, on the national advisory board for Desert Skies Symposium on Research in Music Education, and served on the national steering committee for Sounds of Learning: The Impact of Music Education, an initiative of the National Association of Music Merchants Foundation that supported research examining the roles of music education in the lives of school-age children. He is past National Chair of the Society for Music Teacher Education (SMTE), and is currently the SMTE Symposium Chair and responsible for hosting the biennial Symposium on Music Teacher Education, which has been held on the UNCG campus since 2005.

 

Matthew Thibeault

Matthew D. Thibeault
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music Education
University of Florida, Gainsville
http://www.matthewthibeault.com

Matthew Thibeault lives in Japan and works as an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the online Masters Program at the University of Florida. Thibeault is the chair-elect of the NAfME Philosophy SRIG. During the 2012–2013 school year, he was a Faculty Fellow at the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities. Thibeault was the 2013 recipient of the Outstanding Emerging Researcher Award presented by the Center for Music Education Research at the University of South Florida.

As a researcher, Thibeault regularly publishes in the areas of general music, as well as media and technology (see personal website for publications). He edited the section on media and music education in the Oxford Handbook of Music Education, as well as contributing a chapter for the 2012 NSSE Yearbook, The Place of Music in the 21st Century. He serves on the editorial or advisory boards of Action, Criticism and Theory for Music Education; the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education; The International Journal of Education & the Arts, and the Journal of Music, Technology, and Education. From 2010–2014 he wrote the “Secondary Scene” column in General Music Today. As a member of a research team with a multiyear National Science Foundation grant, he co-authored the 2005 book Designing Everyday Assessment in the Science Classroom (Teachers College Press).

Thibeault studied music education and psychology at Florida State University before completing MA and Ph.D. degrees in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (with a concentration in Arts Education) working with Elliot Eisner at Stanford University. He was a full-time public school music specialist (K–3) for the Portola Valley School District, and later worked as an Artist in Residence at the School of the Arts High School in San Francisco. He previously was a faculty member at San José State University and the University of Illinois.

 

Jackie Wiggins

Jackie Wiggins
Professor of Music Education and Chair of the Department of Music, Theatre, and Dance
Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan

Jackie Wiggins is Professor of Music Education and Chair of the Department of Music, Theatre, and Dance at Oakland University where she teaches graduate courses in psychology of music learning, research in music education, and music curriculum. At Oakland, Wiggins heads the doctoral program in music education: an active, innovative program that attracts students who are interested in studying music learning and teaching from a constructivist perspective. In 2014, she was named the inaugural recipient of Oakland University's Outstanding Graduate Mentor Award.

Internationally known for her work in constructivist music education and children's musical creative process, Wiggins is a prolific author and active presenter. Her professional work includes over 50 publications, more than 200 presentations, and invited keynotes on four continents, including the National Conference of the Australian Society of Music Education (2009), the International Conference for Research in Music Education (RIME 2011), and the Asia-Pacific Symposium on Music Education Research in Taipei (2011). She has taught as a guest instructor at universities throughout the U.S. and abroad and has worked as a research consultant and curricular consultant internationally, nationally, and locally.

Recent publications include the third edition of her seminal book Teaching for Musical Understanding (2015, Oxford University Press) and several invited book chapters, including: "Musical Agency" in the second edition of Gary McPherson's The Child As Musician: A Handbook of Musical Development (2015, Oxford University Press) and "Teaching Music with a Social Constructivist Vision of Learning" in Approaches to Teaching General Music: Methods, Issues, and Viewpoints [Gault & Abril (Eds.), 2015, Oxford University Press]. She is currently guest editor for a special issue on applications of constructivist theory and philosophy to arts education practice for Arts Education Policy Review.

In addition to her work on the CRME Bulletin Editorial Committee, Wiggins serves on the editorial boards of Research Studies in Music Education and the International Journal for Education and the Arts, the advisory board of the Asia-Pacific Journal for Arts Education, and as a reviewer for Psychology of Music, the British Journal of Music Education, the AERA Music SIG, and the International Conference on Narrative Inquiry in Music Education. She has reviewed book manuscripts for Oxford University Press, Springer Publishers, Bloomsbury Publishing, and Indiana University Press. She also serves as a visiting evaluator for the National Association of Schools of Music and on the Board of Directors of the Chamber Music Society of Detroit.

 

Paul G. Woodford

Paul G. Woodford
Professor and Acting Chair, Department of Music Education
University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

Paul Woodford holds degrees from the University of Toronto, the University of Western Ontario, and Northwestern University (Ph.D.) and is professor and former chair of the Department of Music Education at the Don Wright Faculty of Music, the University of Western Ontario. His interests in philosophical, historical, sociological, and political issues affecting the profession have led to many publications, including four books on the history of music in Newfoundland and Labrador, a fifth book, entitled Democracy and Music Education: Liberalism, Ethics, and the Politics of Practice (Indiana University Press, 2005), contributions to The Encyclopedia of Music in Canada (1992), The New Handbook of Research on Music Teaching and Learning (2002), The Oxford Handbook of Music Education (in press), The 111th National Society for the Study of Education Yearbook (in press), and many articles in professional journals. He is past chair of the executive committee of the International Society for the Philosophy of Music Education (2005-7) and is a member of the advisory boards of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, the British Journal of Music Education, and the Philosophy of Music Education Review.



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